Archive for ‘Red Wine’

June 26, 2020

Rocca Bernarda Refosco dal Peduncolo Rosso, 2016

Rocca Bernarda Refosco dal Peduncolo Rosso, 2016

Wow, what a mouthful.  The title I mean.  Makes you think you’ll get more than you do.  Like A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum; just too bad it wasn’t funny on film.

 

Mixed feelings over a mediocre red.  Forcefully acidic, aggressively musky in that wet forest floor sort of fashion, with a dash of oak and a not too unpleasant finish.  Half decent with food, too assertive and in your face as a sipper.

 

Price: $31 at Firefly.

 

Market Liquidity: An unusual grape, an unusual wine.

May 29, 2020

Blue Mountain Reserve Pinot Noir, 2015

Blue Mountain Pinot Noir, 2015

It opens up beautifully.  But it opens up slowly. There is definitely a matrooshka doll onion skin Pandora’s box motif going on.  It’s beauty does not give it the full marks the vintner and pointsters do: it is a tad thin and not nearly as eloquent as other PNs in this price range, and of course BM (not to be confused with BS) likes to amp up the price.  Stick to their under-valued and reasonably priced lovely Pinot Gris…

 

Time was, when we swore by BM PN, buying it by the case; the “regular” and reserve.  Then it went over $30.  Then it went over $35.  Then it went over $40.  Now we can rest our case, so to speak.

 

Price: Gifted, how wonderful is that, but $40 at the vineyard and a yardstick more at private wine stores in YVR.

Market Liquidity: A bit too much clique and not enough populism.

May 29, 2020

Black Sage Vineyard Cabernet Franc, 2017

Black Sage Vineyard Cabernet Franc, 2017

I’m surprised that the last time we blogged about Black Sage was 2014, a full six years ago.  And that was a Cab Sauv; lovely and yummy.  But, as I like to say after a few glasses, “we’ve drunk a lot of BS over the years.”

 

It’s time to just come out and say thank you, BS, for decently priced quite drinkable, hearty reds.  Zero pretension, a lot of heft on the palate, a reasonable amount of the funky Cab Franc spice and leathery smoke.  Exceptional with meat.  No dissent around the table.

 

Price: An under $30 before the four bottle discount at Save-On.

 

Market Liquidity: A plethora of smiley and thumbs up emojis.

May 29, 2020

Natte Valleij Cinsault, 2018

Natte Valley Cinsault, 2018

We are always up for novelty.  After all, isn’t that what drinking wine is all about? Unusual varietal?  Bring it on.  But first, oh my dear God, please, please get rid of the wax on the neck; it’s somewhere between a cut your wrist suicide attempt and wedding reception confetti (a mess either way, and totally unnecessary).

 

Cinsault can grow in climates not known for their wine (say Lebanon) and is widely planted in South Africa where, based on this bottle alone, it should be blended.  We couldn’t determine how and when the pungent, silty fruit of it would be most complementary, as it sipped like vermouth and drank with food astringent.  I would write pale and wan but in fact it was pale and wanting.

 

Price: $30 at Kitsilano Wine

 

Market Liquidity: Beautiful cover, mediocre book.

May 2, 2020

Cote du Rhone Halos de Jupiter, Vacqueyras

Cote du Rhone Halos de Jupiter, Vacqueyras

This is a Grenache Syrah blend that is a slam dunk.  Just wow and wow and wonderful.

 

BC Liquor sells the entry level Cotes du Rhone; it’s fine in its own way, I recommend it on a wine list because for $40 something you can have a decent bottle of red with dinner out (if we’re ever allowed to eat out again).  BC Liquor also sells an over $70 Chateauneuf du Pape.  In Ontario you can score a most wonderful Gigondas for $40.  All hail Jupiter.  But some of the private wine stores in YVR have the just right porridge, an exquisite red that boasts plums, and jammy dark fruits, light tannins and gobs of deliciousness.  Ludicrously drinkable.

 

Price: Around $35 at Kitsilano Wine, but if you but a mixed case of six and you take the 10% discount, we’re talking better than any BC red in that price zone, period.

 

Market Liquidity:  I could self isolate on a case of this.

May 1, 2020

Indigena Pares Balta Organic Garnatxa, 2015

Indigena Pares Balta Organic Garnatxa, 2015

An organic Grenache (or Garnacha which, in parts of Spain, is a Garnatxa) and which drinks a tad sweet, quite floral, maybe a bit heavy on the oak, and that all sounds like bad news but somehow it comes together in a decent fashion, approachable, tasty.  Personally, not our go-to.  We were drinking this back to back with French Grenache where (in the best of circumstances) they nail it, none of the cloying sweetness, all of the minerality, but you could do much worse in BC at the price point.  In fact, I guarantee you will do much worse with BC reds at the price point.  (And look, a 2015 no less.)

 

Price: Around $30 at Kitsilano Wine.

 

Market Liquidity: Opens nicely while you shelter in place.

April 28, 2020

Cape Mentelle Shiraz Cabernet, 2017

Cape Mentelle Shiraz Cabernet, 2017

Well here’s a blast from the past.  Remember when BC Liquor carried Cape Mentelle?  No, I bet you don’t, because it’s been about a decade.  Their workhorse Sem Sauv Bl blend was one of those relatively inexpensive everyday whites of much utility.  We miss it.

 

This is not their finest moment.  And they do have some fine moments (which of course will cost you).  But it’s a lovely change this perky red from Western Australia, perhaps a little surprising how much sweet and how little mouth feel it has, tending to veer away from the typical leathery Oz Shiraz, despite 60% Shiraz to 40% Cab Sauv.

 

Quite decent, all things considered, screw top, not over the top pricey, pleasantly light even at 14.5% alcohol.

 

Price: $30 at BC Liquor.

 

Market Liquidity: Like a nice find at a garage sale.

March 27, 2020

Faustino I Gran Reserva Rioja, 2001

Faustino I Gran Reserva Rioja, 2001

It’s the end of the world as we know it.  Better make the best of it.

 

Was this better than the 2006 we so eagerly sipped over the holidays?  No.  It wasn’t.  The 2006 was better.  Was the 2001 good?  Oh, Jesus, Joseph and Mary: Heavenly.

 

This was as warm and cozy as lolling on a [faux] bearskin in front of the fire, I see movies set in the Alps with fondue on the table and apres-ski soft core sex.  Deeply satisfying.  Lovely.  But, I should add, it just wasn’t quite as hardcore, as explosive, as the 2006.  Despite the price.

 

So there you go. Two delectable poisons, both superb, just one finished .01 hundredths of a second later and takes silver.

 

Price: Expensive.  Like over $60 before tax.  But you know what?  It’s the end of the world as we know it.

 

Market Liquidity: If you have any liquidity left in the market, buy wine.

March 27, 2020

Domaine Ollier Taillefer Faugeres, 2015 and Chapoutier Les Meysonniers, Crozes Hermitage, 2016

Chapoutier Les Meysonniers, Crozes Hermitage, 2016Domaine Ollier Taillefer Faugeres, 2015

We’ve been drinking a lot of “hot review” wines lately and coming up short.  Two today for example.

 

Both these wines are 90 pointsters and neither lived up to our anticipated hype.  The Faugeres had no breadth, it’s decent, palatable, mildly interesting; herby, wet earth, dry. The tannins simply clashed outright with a simple chicken dinner. The Crozes Hermitage must have legs; it has hints of greatness but you never know.  Gismondi said it had a twist of garrigue (that’s acceptable to write in the Saturday paper; the NYT is equally cryptic on Saturday, we expect having to use Google to decipher), and suggested three to five years.  Yes; three minimum.  We went looking for it because he quoted the price at $27, but it was in fact $30 before tax.  We saw the merit in two or three of the Chapoutier in the cellar; the Ollier seemed better off in the late afternoon sun in the Languedoc.

 

Price: $33 and $30 at BC Liquor and, occasionally, at Marquis.  The Chapoutier is regularly available at Kits Wine Cellar; feel the braille label.

 

Market Liquidity: Win some, lose some.

March 27, 2020

Altesino Rosso di Montalcino, 2016

Altesino Rosso di Montalcino, 2016

Reviewers love this wine.  We were mildly satisfied.  Out of the bottle it has no new world charm; it needs a minimum of 20 minutes decanted to bloom—and then it rewards.  Decanted or even aerated, whatever you’ve got.  More subtle than the Vajra we’ve been addicted to of late, the smoky, earthy, coolness of it with just tinges of berry and plum, come on lovely.  Not a long finish.  It might have legs, and we have a few laid down to find out, but for food friendliness and to please company, you’d actually be better off with something like the Celestiale.  It was a slog to source, then of course we wanted to try it out to see if it fit our palate, then  a double slog to find it again to lie some down.  Work equals force times distance and there was too much of it all; thanks BCL.  I think Gismondi referenced it as a lesser Brunello which, I think, is disingenuous.

 

Price: $29 at BC Liquor (when and if you can find it).

 

Market Liquidity: Well worth it, but not worth the effort to source.