Archive for ‘White wine’

June 8, 2018

Monte Del Fra Ca’ Del Magro, 2015

Superiore bianco indeed.  Fragrant and floral.  Enticing.  Light and lovely.  The yum in yummy.

 

A crazy legs blend of Garganega, Treviano Toscano, Tocai, Cortese, and then a smidgen of Chardonnay, Riesling, and Malvasio.  Aging on the lees is what the reviewers write.  Wine drinkers will just enjoy.  Or should just enjoy.

 

A most desirable departure from the usual suspects.  Here comes summer.

 

Gobs of gentle fruit, more blossom and aroma than meat, gorgeously balanced, a tight, acid finish with a plummy aftertaste.  Beautiful on the palate, a superb aperitif, and very friendly with light cheese and seafood.  Who can complain?  Buy six for the patio.

 

Price: An extremely reasonable $23 at BC Liquor.

 

Market Liquidity: It writes happily, Best Wishes from Napoli.

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May 17, 2018

Lock and Worth Sauvignon Blanc, Semillon, 2016

92 points over at Gismondi.  Wow.  (Wow as in yikes or oy vey or me oh my oh.)  We were unimpressed.  We were nonplussed.  We were disappointed.  From start to finish all we could think of was Australia and France and how they nail this.  It was plain, simple to simplistic, and with a banal finish like banana pith.  We poured the first glass with anticipation and an open mind.  By the end of the bottle we were just plain let down.

 

Price: $22 at Save-on Foods.

 

Market Liquidity: This is to Bordeaux Blanc what Fisher Price is to a Rubik’s cube.

May 16, 2018

Fitzpatrick Family Vineyards Ehrenfelser, 2016

In general, the BC Okanagan produces some decent Ehrenfelser which is, mostly, refreshing, light, zippy yet often a tad innocuous.  As the warmer weather hits, a good varietal to have for sipping on the patio.  That said, I’m not sure what Gismondi meant when he said it was one of the better aromatic white wines of BC but only clocked it in at 87 points.  I might say, conversely, it’s one more of the less than memorable BC whites and clock it in at 88, given the steep competition.  Anyone for forgettable Pinot [fill in the blank]? Welcome to BC.  The stainless steel then oak seems to be of little consequence.

 

Price: I think on sale at Save On Foods for $19.99.

 

Market Liquidity: At least it’s not Yellow Tail.

April 5, 2018

Jagged Rock Vineyard C#, 2016

What the hell?  Our first response was what gall.  This wine has a pronounced sense of self and nothing going for it; if it was from Italy, France or Spain I’d call it EuroTrash.  It’s a blend (a ridiculous over the top blend) with no centre, no focus, no sense.  It’s all over the map in terms of flavour profile and inconsequential on the finish.  Sharp with no finesse, rigorous with no soft edge, and as for citrus, I mean salt the rim of a glass and pour yourself a tequila.  Oh, and look at the price.

 

We like our SemWe love our Sem Sauv blends.  If we could afford Bordeaux Blanc we’d have a cellar full.  Skim the site to see how true this is.  Most recently we  pulled out of the cellar an ancient (slight exaggeration) L’Ecole Sem; now that was worth the money—and a pittance compared to this.  So if you take that brilliant combo, Sem Sauv Bl,  and then you add Chardonnay and then you add Pinot Gris and then you add Muscat, well Jesus, that’s just Long Island Ice Tea, wine style.

 

Ever had a Long Island Ice Tea? The only thing missing is whiskey.  Add Sherry and call this a D minus.  It’s just an excuse to get drunk.

 

I have no idea who would like this, what food you would drink it with to derive pleasure (simultaneously), and why.  There are apparently three people on Vivino who think it’s the bomb.  So there you go, seven billion on the planet, three who call it a masterpiece.  Call me an outlier.

 

Price: $35.99 at Save-On Foods in White Rock.  $36 before tax!!!

 

Market Liquidity: Save yourself $20 and pick up a Portuguese Branco and swoon at the expertise.

 

March 21, 2018

L’Ecole No 41 Semillon, 2012

From the cellar: We found the very last bottle.  We hung on as long as we could.  But then the temptation became too great. Glug.

 

Our first post about a L’Ecole Semillion was here, and after that we bought it in multiples, stashing them away; but as we got through several lying down we posted on this vintage two years ago here.  Not much has changed; this wine just got better.  So much better.

 

Where to begin?  All over the map with wild tangents of bass an treble: White pepper, woodsy, minerally, piquant, a balanced acidity, vanilla, plum, fresh bread, a scrumptious finish longer than the Oscars.

 

What was really exquisite about the “lay down” was how muted everything became but the wine lost none of its expression.  Very hard to articulate.

 

Price: No recollection.  Used to be able to get it for $16 in Blaine, WA.

 

Market Liquidity: A simple treasure.

March 16, 2018

Haywire Waters & Banks Sauvignon Blanc, 2015

It has a little bit of the flint of Sancerre but not much.  It has a bit of the grassy wet hay of a Kiwi SB, but only in passing.  Blind it doesn’t even really resemble Sauvignon Blanc, at least the way it typically present, and on this some will have a deflated set of expectations on the screw top.  I disagree with a few of the high profile critics who called it typical.  Of what exactly? BC? Surely not SB.  All that aside, good God is this delicious.

 

The malolactic fermentation is, I think, a driver of the unique and distinct flavour; maybe not to everyone’s taste but I could drink this by the truckload. Very herby, like the dry, sagebrush of the south Okanagan, all scent, no oak, some stone fruit on the palate and finishing with an acidity that makes you reach for another glass.  Very hard to sip (meaning you want to drink and drink).  Wonderful with food.  Not as brutal on the budget as other “grey label” Haywire bottles.  Difficult-ish to find.  A high pointer from Gismondi.

 

The crushpad (in our experience) turns out wine that’s all over the map.  But sometimes they score big time.  If you see it, buy it.  It’s opioid-esque in its attractiveness.

 

Price: $25 from the vineyard.

 

Market Liquidity: Crisp, clean, incredible.

March 12, 2018

Masseria Li Veli, Fiano, 2016

A light and refreshing “summer sipper” which as spring arrives prematurely suits the urge for fresh asparagus alongside seafood.  Puglia churns out some unusual but really appealing simple wines, relatively easy on the budget and novel enough to warrant a second purchase; we are always up for a test run.

 

Metallic like pure Semillon, hints of menthol, acidic and tangy as it hits the tongue, peach and honey on the palate, a soft nutty finish.  Umami without the other four components.  The proverbial “drink now” white wine.

 

The surname, an incidental pun on lively in English, seems apt.

 

Price: $26 at Kitsilano Wine

 

Market Liquidity: The only thing missing is effervescence.

March 2, 2018

Piekenierskloof “The Tea Leaf” Chenin Blanc Blend, 2016

We love our Chenin; French, South African, Australian, bring it on.  We wanted to love this.  Low alcohol, screw cap, high altitude vines.  Maybe our predilection for the varietal and relatively unrealistic expectations were too much for the W. O. Piekenierskloof, because for us it was a bomb.

 

Bruised fruit.  Dry, brittle dry, earthy, mushroom broth, lightly acidic, kumquat on the finish with a pasty, green, tarragon-ish herby note.  Not food friendly.  Dull as a sipper.

 

Perplexing, confusing, disappointing.  Despite the novelty of its remote high terrain and the rooibos growing in its midst.

 

Not balanced or terribly pleasant and unusual in a tiresome (as opposed to curious) fashion.  Much loved by the critics which is why we tried but it’s one strike and yer out with this.  Sorry W. O.

 

Price: $33 at Kitsilano Wine Cellar.

 

Market Liquidity: Like idling in a parking lot.  It’s middling.

February 27, 2018

Rioja Conde Valdemar, Finca Alto Cantabria 2015

Unique, unusual and yet delectable.  Not sure there is any other way to put it.  Viura, mainly, and some Verdejo.

 

A golden nectar, not as weighty as it appears, flinty on the nose but tropical on the tongue, a strong punch of coconut (think Hawaiian Tropic suntan oil) with other herbaceous flavours, light but identifiable oak, and a palate cleansing finish.

 

Ludicrously food friendly.  Wash down shellfish, drink alongside mixed tapas, sip with snacks, it can even battle pasta in a tomato sauce.

 

Despite the 91 point WS seal on the label you can see online it is not without many detractors.  Many detractors.  Is that because it’s different than you might anticipate, unlike common varietals, heavy when it should be light and light when it should be heavy?  Or is it because white Rioja is such a hard sell? It’s like the pit-bull of varietals, much maligned and misunderstood.  There is definitely an oxymoronic quality to this bottle, but I would say charismatic in its complexity, and appealing because of that.  If you can bravely face the Saturday NYT crossword, then this white is for you.  If you are still stuck in the black hole of innocuous Pinot Grigio, stay clear.

 

Price: $32 at Kits Wine Cellar.

 

Market Liquidity: Like Escher’s impossible staircase, a little hard to define.

February 22, 2018

Au Bon Climat Santa Barbara County Chardonnay, 2014

 

Au Bon Climat: Here is the ring.  Will you accept?

 

Words fail to express how enjoyable this wine is.  Was.  In a text it’s a yin yang emoji.  In a court it’s the scales of justice.  In a wine review it’s well over 90 points.  All you need to know is it’s the anti-California Chardonnay, all flavour, no pretense, a sleeper at the back of the wine store.  A perfectly balanced Chard, and I mean perfectly, astonishingly balanced, a marriage of appealing acid with butterscotch velvet, not too much oak, nothing cloying, a lilting floral presence on the tongue that is delectable.  The levels and depth of flavour are simply remarkable.  This is the type of bottle that gets you excited about Chardonnay all over again.

 

Price: $30 USD in Narita duty free.

 

Market Liquidity: Subtlety personified.